SKIL heat guns

Excellent ergonomics together with smart features that prevent overheating make these heat guns your ideal partner. SKIL heat guns are made for jobs like stripping and drying paint, applying heat-shrink tubes and (de)soldering.

Tool usage

What is a heat gun used for?

  1. What is a heat gun used for?
    Removing paint is probably the best known job for a heat gun. But you can do lots of other things with a heat gun, for example bending plastic tubes, welding foils, soldering pipes and defrosting.

The right temperature and airflow settings

  1. The right temperature and airflow settings
    The right temperature setting for a heat gun depends on the job. The airflow setting is important too. That depends on the material and how quickly you work. You get the best results with the right temperature and airflow settings.
  2. Generally, the heat gun’s highest temperature setting is suitable for soldering or thawing water pipes and can also be used to remove paint. The lower settings are ideal for drying paint and shaping plastic. Always run a test on an inconspicuous part of your workpiece at low temperature and gradually increase the temperature until you get the right result. That will depend on the job. When you’re removing lacquer or paint with a heat gun for example, you’ll see the paint softening up and bubbles beginning to form when the right temperature is reached. You’ll find it easy to scrape the paint off. If you want to solder copper pipes with a heat gun, you’ll know you have the right temperature as soon as the soldering wire starts to melt in the joints.
  3. Again, to achieve the best results, various air flow settings should be tested on the heat gun. If you want to heat up a specific part of the work area, while soldering or welding small print plates, say, you will normally work with a low airflow. That’s because you won’t want to heat up the rest of the surface. If you use a heat gun to start a barbecue or burn off paint from a large surface area, a high airflow will work well for you. However, you’ll have to adjust the airflow as soon as you get close to fragile parts, for example when burning paint off a window pane.

What are different heat gun nozzles for?

  1. What are different heat gun nozzles for?
    Nozzles enable precise working on different jobs. For example to direct the airflow to a specific point, or to keep it away from a window. A lot of different nozzles are available on the market, and some of the most common types are shown here.
  2. 1) Reduction nozzle:
    This nozzle can be used to heat part of the work surface. This is handy for soldering and desoldering jobs as well as bending plastic tubing. Small-diameter reduction nozzles (Ø 9mm) are used with an electronically controlled heat gun. You can use the tool on jobs that demand greater precision, such as welding printing plates. Small-diameter nozzles are also used with other attachments that are suitable for electronically controlled heat guns.
  3. 2) Reflector nozzle:
    This nozzle is ideal for bending plastic tubing, soldering copper pipes, applying heat shrink tubing, and it’s also suitable for other jobs that require the workpiece to be heated all around.
  4. 3) Surface nozzle:
    A surface nozzle blows hot air over the work surface. You can use a surface nozzle to remove old floor coverings or vinyl at a very high temperature or to strip paint.
  5. 4) Glass protection nozzle:
    You use a glass protection nozzle to deflect air and protect glass when stripping paint from a window frame or softening putty.
  6. 5) Slot nozzle:
    A slot nozzle is attached to a small-diameter reduction nozzle. This combination is perfectly suited to welding PVC tarpaulin. It’s important to note that this nozzle can only be used with electronically controlled heat guns.
  7. 6) Welding nozzle:
    A welding nozzle is also attached to a small-diameter reduction nozzle. If you need to weld plastic, you need to guide welding rods of the appropriate material through the nozzle. The rods then melt in the weld seam. It’s important to note that this nozzle can only be used with electronically controlled heat guns.

Overload protection

  1. Overload protection

    It might not be something you give too much thought to, but it’s important to remember that a heat gun can easily overheat. The heat is reflected back towards the gun by the piece you are working on. Fortunately, most heat guns are protected from this as otherwise they could overheat before you realise what’s happening, leading to damage.

    Most heat guns come with a thermal protection, also known as constant heat control. This mechanism controls the maximum temperature by shutting off the main heating element when the tool overheats, while the ventilator continues to work to cool down the engine. The heating element is then switched back on automatically when the normal temperature is reached. The great thing is that you don’t notice anything, so you can just carry on working.

    Some heat guns come with an electronic control to ensure a constant temperature. This overheating protection is controlled automatically, so you can even use small diameter nozzles for various soldering, desoldering and welding jobs. The electronics control the maximum temperature by automatically reducing the temperature when the tool starts to overheat, without you even noticing.

How to use a heat gun?

  1. How to use a heat gun?
    A heat gun is the ideal tool for a wide variety of DIY jobs. Take a look at this video for basic instructions. SKIL helps!

How to use a heat gun for welding plastics?

  1. How to use a heat gun for welding plastics?
    Welding plastics is one of the many jobs you can do with a heat gun. SKIL shows you how to weld a plastic slide with welding rods. Take a look at our video to learn more about welding plastics with a heat gun!

How to use a heat gun for PVC tarpaulin welding?

  1. How to use a heat gun for PVC tarpaulin welding?
    With the right accessories, a heat gun is extremely suitable for PVC tarpaulin welding. You just need to know how to. Watch our video to find out more about PVC tarpaulin welding. SKIL helps!

How to use a heat gun to apply heat-shrink tubing?

  1. How to use a heat gun to apply heat-shrink tubing?
    You can use heat-shrink tubing to repair the insulation of wires or to cover joints. A heat gun is the ideal tool for this job. Choose a heat-shrink tube that matches the diameter of the workpiece. Remember to fit the tube evenly over the centre of the joint and to heat the tube all round. Take a look at our video to learn more.  

How to use a heat gun to solder copper pipes?

  1. How to use a heat gun to solder copper pipes?
    As well as all kinds of other DIY jobs, a heat gun is very handy for soldering copper pipes. It’s most suitable for working with soft solder with a melting point below 400°C. Before soldering, you need to thoroughly clean and carefully assemble your workpiece, but you can easily do it yourself. Watch the video in which SKIL shows you how to use a heat gun to solder copper pipes. 

How to use a heat gun for desoldering?

  1. How to use a heat gun for desoldering?
    If you want to replace a soldered copper pipe or joint, you need to desolder your workpiece first. SKIL shows you how to use a heat gun for desoldering jobs. Take a look at our video to find out more about desoldering with a heat gun!

How to use a heat gun to remove linoleum and vinyl flooring?

  1. How to use a heat gun to remove linoleum and vinyl flooring?
    A heat gun is a versatile tool and is extremely suitable for removing linoleum and vinyl flooring. SKIL shows you how to. Take a look at the video to learn more about removing flooring with a heat gun.

How to use a heat gun to strip paint from a window frame?

  1. How to use a heat gun to strip paint from a window frame?
    It’s possible to use a heat gun next to glass; you just need the right accessory. Always use a glass-protection nozzle for DIY jobs like this. SKIL shows you how to use a heat gun to strip paint from a window frame. Take a look at our video to learn more! 

Step-by-step and DIY hints